SURBL Announces New Experimental Blacklist

Today, the team behind the SURBL domain blaclists announced a new, experimental blacklist: xs.surbl.org.

As announced on the SURBL-Announce list: "An experimental source of some snowshoe and pill domains is now being published in xs.surbl.org.  SURBL considers this feed to be experimental and would very much welcome feedback about it, particularly about any false positives.  Does anyone know anyone who actually wants to receive snowshoe messages?"

You can read the entire announcement here.

Status of dnsbl.karmasphere.com: SHUTTING DOWN

As messaged to the Karmasphere-Users and Karmasphere-Announce mailing lists, the Karmasphere Reputation Services data feeds are being retired. This means that the associated blacklist(s), including the karmasphere.email-sender.dnsbl.karmasphere.com DNSBL zone, and any other DNSBL/DNSWL zones under karmasphere.com. It is unclear to the author if karmasphere.org is similarly affected.

Karmasphere has indicated that the feed service will be discontinued on November 16, 2009. It's very important that all Karmasphere-using mail administrators remove any Karmasphere-hosted DNSBLs from their configuration before that date, else inbound receipt of legitimate email messages could be delayed or otherwise impacted.

For more information, click on over to Spam Resource to read a copy of the Karmasphere notice.

Status of rbl.cluecentral.net: DEAD

The rbl.cluecentral.net DNSBLs were created in 2001 or 2002 by Sabri Berisha. The goal: To list "all known assigned IPv4 address space, by originating AS and by country. [This is based on] a full routing view is extracted daily from a router in the default free zone. The AS->country mapping is done via the statistics which are being provided by the four RIR's, ARIN, APNIC, LACNIC and RIPE."

Status of blackholes.us: DEAD

Created by Matthew Evans in 2002, the goal of the blackholes.us site was "to create (yet more) DNS blocklists of spammers, spam supporting ISPs, spamware hosts, dialup networks, and other notorious email abusers originating in the United States." Matthew published many different DNSBL zones, listing various countries, ISPs, netblocks, etc.

Status of vox.schpider.com: DEAD

Scott Glassbrook writes: "I ran a dnsbl, vox.schpider.com many many years ago. I stopped the DNSBL back in June of 2006, and shut down the server it was running on. 

Status of bl.open-whois.org: DEAD

As of July, it looks like a popular blacklist used in default SpamAssassin installations is no more. Users were reporting false positive issues, where every message checked by SpamAssassin would receive a score of 2.43, supposedly due to the sender being listed in the blacklist bl.open-whois.org.

TQMCUBE Status Updated

Here's a quick note to let you know that I've updated my page of information on the long-dead TQMCUBE blacklist. Click here for more information.

SORBS Status: Shutting Down or For Sale

As reported on Spamtacular and on SORBS' website:

"ANNOUNCEMENT: Possible SORBS Closure... It comes with great sadness that I have to announce the imminent closure of SORBS. The University of Queensland have decided not to honor their agreement with myself and SORBS and terminate the hosting contract.

Status of dnsbl.net.au: DEAD

The blacklist at dnsbl.net.au has announced it is winding down. As noted in a February 25, 2009 posting on its website, "Please note that as of Wednesday, April 1, 2009 the DNSBL.NET.AU blacklist will cease to exist."

As of this writing on April 29th, 2009, I do still see active entries when querying via DNS, but I assume that these are likely to go away soon. If you utilize this blacklist, I'd recommend removing it from your MTA or spam filter configuration.

Status of DSBL: DEAD

The DNSBL called "DSBL" is no more. As of March 11, 2009, their website reports: "DSBL is GONE and highly unlikely to return. Please remove it from your mail server configuration."