Status of DEAD

Uh-oh! On or about September 19th, the domain seems to have expired. Now when you visit the website, you are informed that the domain is for sale. Also, you'll now find a wildcard A record in DNS, meaning that any lookup of any host name in DNS under will result in a positive response being returned.

The net result here is that due to the domain now having a wildcard A record, any users of the Burnt Tech DNSBL now find that they are blocking all inbound mail. If you were using the blacklist to filter inbound spam, you'll need to remove it from your mail server or spam filter configuration immediately, as it is going to impede your ability to receive any mail.

Reviewing Internet Archive versions of the Burnt Tech DNSBL website, it appears that the blacklist has been in action since at least 2006. From a 2015 archived copy of the website: "The Block List runs entirely automated and designed to avoid listings of spamtrap hits due to bounces of forged spam, virus bounces, and "real" mail servers emitting the occasional spam. It tries very hard to avoid listing legitimate mail sources. It does not attempt to list every possible spam source."

No other information was available regarding ownership, listing criteria or history of this DNSBL.

(H/T: Matthew Vernhout)

Status of ALIVE

The "Truncate" DNSBL (zone lists IPv4 addresses that have been observed transmitting "email containing spam, scams, viruses, or other malware based on statistics in the global GBUdb network." This "Good, Bad, Ugly database (GBUdb)" is a "real-time collaborative IP reputation system," based on statistics collected by email threat protection software Message Sniffer.

If you're listed on the Truncate DNSBL, can you request removal? No, explains the website. IP addresses are removed automatically, usually within a couple of days of the bad activity having ceased. They warn, however, that in some instances, if enough bad activity was denoted, it may take longer for an IP address to automatically disappear from their list.

Have any more information you'd like to share about this blacklist? Please feel free to contact me and I'll be happy to update this page with your additional information.

Status of DEAD

As noted by participants of the SDLU mailing list, the Russian Dial-up User List at the domain is no more.

The Russian Dial-up User List website is no longer to be found at; when you visit that domain you find a simple Russian-language "this domain is for sale" page.

As of May 19, 2015, this domain seems to have been set to "wildcard" status in DNS. This means that is effectively "listing the world;" any site still using the blacklist zone will reject all inbound mail until this DNSBL is removed from that mail server's configuration.

The Russian Dial-up User list appears to have been a dialup or dynamic blacklist. The intent of this type of anti-spam tool is usually to block SMTP connections from hosts that aren't typically expected to be running mail services.

H/T: Neil Schwartzman

Reminder: AHBL is Shutting Down

As previously reported, the AHBL DNSBL has been shut down.

Please note that the publisher of the AHBL DNSBL has indicated that she will set all of the DNS zones to "wildcard" status as of January 1st. This means that AHBL will be effectively "listing the world;" any site still using any of the AHBL DNSBL zones will reject all inbound mail until the AHBL DNSBL zones are removed from that mail server's configuration.

Brielle Bruns posted the following to the SDLU mailing list on 12/26/14: "Figured I'd give one last notice that I'm about to wildcard all of the public AHBL zones on Jan 1st, 2015.

"If you are still using them in your mail servers, or know someone who is, now would be a good time to remove them.  Most of the major packages that came with configuration options for using the AHBL have long since removed them (such as SpamAssassin), but there are still many many people out there who make no effort to maintain their services and/or don't upgrade/check configurations.

The private zones which some people know of and have access to will not be affected by this wildcarding, as they are still considered 'active' and 'maintained'."

Status of DEAD

Today, Mark E. Jeftovic of EasyDNS warned readers of the Mailop list that it is unwise to use the DNSBL "" due to a combination of abandonment and administrative issues.

He writes: "As some of you may know, we recently took over and it's customer base.

We've found a domain on the system: which is delegated to zoneedit nameservers, broken (it is not allowed to zone transfer from it's designated master), unresponsive (account owner is not answering email, has an address in Sri Lanka and no telephone number), is using excessive queries (~ >500M queries per day on a "free dns" domain) and attracting repeated, multiple DDoS attacks.

As such, we will be wildcarding this zone and setting a long TTL fairly soon.

If you're actually using this RBL in your MTAs, now's a good time to stop. (this RBL is broken on 5 out of it's 6 delegated nameservers across 3 separate providers)."


On March 26, 2014, blacklist administrator Brielle Bruns announced that the Abusive Hosts Blocking List DNSBLs are to be shut down.

In email to me, she explained:
"After quite a bit of thought and consideration, I've decided that it is time to wind down some of the AHBL's public DNSbl services - specifically the dnsbl, ircbl, and rhsbl. 
We've had a good 11 year run with the lists.  Times have changed -- with the deployment of IPv6 moving full speed ahead, I don't feel that the current implementation of our DNSbl services are suited to the task. 
This doesn't mean that the AHBL is going away - we'll still be around, just focusing our efforts on a mix of other anti-abuse related things and a relaunch of the RHSbl (likely in 2-3 months, possibly sooner). 
I look forward to continuing to work with the community, and appreciate and value the feedback I've received over the years."
As a result, the lists, and, and associated public look up tools are being retired.

I've known Brielle for many years and my interactions with her have been universally positive. Congratulations on a long eleven year run with AHBL, and I hope whatever she works on next is something she finds fun and fulfilling.

Status of ALIVE

DNSBL Chile, created in 2011, appears to be a Chilean homegrown effort to tackle spamblocking from a local perspective. As they explain on their website: "Existing DNSBL services aim to block spam based on the type and origin affecting certain types of user. Chilean spam is generally ignored by these DNSBLs, mainly because of the language barrier. This raises the need for a specific DNSBL for Chile, which is able to investigate cases of spam in South-American Spanish."

The DNSBL zone is just "" and they report a few different types of responses: and for "verified spam sources," for "verified scam sources," and and for DUL/PBL-like dynamic/"should not be running an MTA" entries.

I don't know much about this blacklist in particular but it's always nice to see somebody attempt to address a previously segment or region's spam problem.  If you have any thoughts or details around this list, don't hesitate to drop me a line.

(Crappy translation above courtesy of my high school Spanish + a little help from Google Translate.)

Status of APEWS: ????

Long-standing (though not very accurate) blacklist APEWS seemed to be down for the count. Their website at has been down since March 15th, according to David Ritz.

My recommendation to mail administrators is to stop using APEWS. But then again, was anybody using APEWS recently, anyway?

For history's sake, here's a link to the article I published long ago, explaining what to do if you find yourself blacklisted by APEWS.

APEWS was previously down for three weeks in August, 2010.

Update: APEWS appears to have returned somewhere around May 1st, 2013.

It goes down, it comes back up, it goes down again, it comes back up again. At this point I think we'll just call it a status of "?????"

Status of DEAD

The DNSBL appears to have gone offline as of April 2, 2013. It appears to have been created in early 2011 by somebody known as "Tom from TRBL," whom I observed participating in various email discussion lists. I've emailed Tom and will update this page if I receive any further details.

I recommend removing from any blacklist checking you're doing. Any time a blacklist is shut down, there's a chance that they will end up putting in a wildcard DNS record, which ends up effectively "blacklisting the world" and causing problems for any receiving sites who still have that DNSBL configured in their mail server configuration.

(Thanks to Martijn Grooten for the heads up.)